Paper Girls Review

A while back, I posted a comic book haul and since then I have gone back and forth between reading comics and reading books. My boyfriend has gone comic book crazy–buying membership discount cards at our local store, scouring Amazon, desperate for the latest editions to come out in trade paperback format (we have a thing against buying every individual issue when it looks so much better compiled together). Meanwhile, I am so-so on it. While I love the terseness of the comics, being able to read one, two, three in a day and feel completed, I also crave full volumes of books–like 400 pages of prose. That’s just really my thing, I think. But that certainly doesn’t mean I can’t appreciate a good comic book and the Paper Girls series hits that mark.


Paper Girls 1 & 2 writing by Brian Vaughan; art by Cliff Chiang; colors by Matt Wilson; and letters by Jared Fletcher
Published by Image Comics (#1) on April 5th 2016 and (#2) December 5th 2016
Genres: Science Fiction, Strong Female Leader(s),
Pages: 144 and 128 respectively
Source: Amazon // Goodreads // Barnes and Nobles

Final Review: 

Paper Girls 1: 4 out of 5  // ★★★★☆

Paper Girls 2: 4 out of 5 // ★★★★☆


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So why didn’t I give these comics 5 out of 5 stars seeing as this is really the only series that I’ve gotten to the next edition? (I did read the next two after the first of Fables and just fell out of it). I think the main point for me is that I was confused, and (slight spoiler) nothing really gets resolved in the second one. I understand that the series will continue, and therefore can’t put everything on the table right away, but after reading through the second one, I was still like “wait, what?” Part of this was because I read Paper Girls 1 only a few months after it came out and then put it away. When Paper Girls 2 came out, it had been a few months since I read the first volume and had already read many books after it, that I actually seemed to forget what actually happened in the first one! So I set into the second one with almost a blank slate (my bad) and ended in more confusion. Perhaps I need to just re-read the first one and then re-read the second one all in one sitting to at least understand a little bit!

Other than my confusion–which in all honesty is probably part of the story itself; the writers aren’t going to give everything away in the first two books! I’m just a complainer–the story is great. The art is great. Everything is great! Four 12-year-old girls are not only taking on a male-dominated job–paper routes–they are also thrust into a time warp with dinosaurs, future versions of themselves, and overall confusion, which certainly doesn’t go along with regular, female-lead stories. No one is a princess, in fact quite the opposite with one of the girls being a regular smoker and avid curser. No one is a damsel in distress, though sometimes they do need saving, but certainly not by any boy, instead by their friends.

Most likely intending to, the creators of these girls and their tumultuous tale are having a conversation with today’s people. Starting even from the physical copy, boys and girls, men and women, can enjoy Paper Girls. Comics have stereotypically been a hobby only boys seemed to possess, while us girls were given dolls and pink things. But now that women are finding their voice, pushing through to the other side–the blue, male-dominated side–things that were once considered masculine are being upturned (might I add that young boys are also pushing through onto the pink side as well by showing their interests in fashion, dolls, etc. and I think this is great!). So by making a comic about girls, the creators instantly upheave the stereotypes associated with comics. Furthermore, as mentioned previously, they could have made the girls do more innocent, female-like things, but nope! Instead, the four are ruthless little girls who are suddenly tasked with saving the world from some sort of time warp that they don’t even fully understand.

I think these are a great addition to any woman’s or girl’s shelf. They are funny and curious, the girls are real, the story, while confusing (in a good way), urges the reader to figure what is going happen to this strange group of mismatched girls. Who do we trust in the year 2016? How are there different dimensions and dinosaurs all of a sudden? What is going on!

I really love the art style, it compliments both the girls from the 80’s and also the modernism from 2016. I’m not sure how to describe it other than sketchiness with harsh, dark lines that promote the seriousness of the plot as well as maintaining the cartoon-esque characters that keep it a comic book.

I’m not sure what to expect in the volume 3 trade paperback, but I’m hoping some loose ends will be tied together, and I know more questions will come out of it. Who is that bearded man?!

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My First Comic Books! (I know, right?)

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So I was never into comic books–I’m a bad nerd. Sure I love superheroes, male and female, but the extensive canon for each? Not so much. I had my stint with Manga in middle school–like most girls do–but that didn’t last long. Although, I do still love Fruits Basket and always will.

But suddenly, my Barnes and Noble set up a table with a crudely photoshopped sign reading: College Con above a full table of new, trade comic books. There were many (okay all) that I didn’t know about, and only a handful of employees and costumers were showing interest. In fact, if it weren’t for my boyfriend, I would have continued walking past that table every day, unseeing.

However, my boyfriend mentioned that he was grabbing the trade copy of Black Panther and a few others, just to try out since the sale price was Buy 2, get 1 Free! Plus my discount? Why not?

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Here is the haul that I picked up (four books) plus one I snagged in Philly. If anyone is interested, my boyfriend is totally obsessed with Saga and The Wicked and the Divine. Those are his top two and has started his own mini collection of those. But those don’t interest me too much, so here are the ones that I thought looks good:

  • How To Talk to Girls at Parties — Neil Gaiman, Fabio Moon, Gabriel Ba // A man recalls his first party as a fifteen-year-old and the strange world of women that he walks in on.
  • Paper Girls — Brian Vaughan, Cliff Chian, Matt Wilson, Jared Fletcher // Four young paper delivery girls stumble upon a shocking, headline-worthy story.
  • DC Comics Bombshells — Marguerite Bennett, Marguerite Sauvage // Written by women, drawn by women, for women; female superheroes from around the world are recruited to fight in WWII.
  • Fables: Legends in Exile — Bill Willingham, Lan Medina, Steve Leialoha, Craig Hamilton // [I actually have no idea what this one is about so here’s a brief description] When a savage creature known only as the Adversary conquered the fabled lands of legends and fairy tales, all of the infamous inhabitants of folklore were forced into exile
  • ApocalyptiGirl — Andrew MacLean // Aria searches for an ancient relic at the end of the world along with her cat, Jelly Bean, and hopes to return home.

I’ve already finished Paper Girls and How to Talk to Girls at Parties; they both have me seriously intrigued but I’m not 100% sold on loving them. I’m certainly going to buy the next trade copy of Paper Girls so I can see what happens. From what I am to understand, How to Talk to Girls at Parties is a stand alone comic but the back of the hardcover book says it should be turned into a film adaptation by 2017!

I’ve also started Bombshells, but this one is the one I’m struggling with the most. An all female cast, written by women and designed by women? It sounds amazing! However, I have a few gripes with it. First, once Book 1 ends and Book 2 begins, the art style changes. I am to understand that they have gotten several artists to design the different books and, while this is awesome, I was totally in love with the first Book 1 style and the Book 2 style is so different that I’m thrown off. Second, it’s taking me so long to get into it! All of the characters get a long introduction and backstory, so long that all of Book 1 and most of Book 2 are just background information, preparing the reader for the true story–which I don’t even know what that is! I haven’t gotten to that part yet!

So while I’m looking forward to finishing my collection, and of course complete the series that I end up enjoying, I don’t think I’m going to change my entire book collection into comics. It is fun to have a story with pictures (that makes it sound so childish, but I can’t think of another way to describe it!) but they’re too short for me. It took me less than ten minutes to read How to Talk to Girls at Parties! I can read a novel pretty quickly, but still at least two hours. I enjoy more in-depth stories, long plot lines, difficult characters to grasp, etc. But like I said, I am enjoying the ones I have picked out and I think they will be a little guilty pleasure.

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