Scrappy Little Nobody Review

Anna Kendrick, why are you so cute? Just look at your little face on the cover of this book–you’re so cute!

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Scrappy Little Nobody by Anna Kendrick
Published by Touchstone
Genres: Autobiography
Pages: 304
Source: Amazon // Goodreads // Barnes and Nobles

Final Review: 3 out of 5 ★★★☆☆


I guarantee everyone that has read your book will say the same thing: I want to be your best friend. Can we be best friends? Is that too much to ask?

I got Scrappy Little Nobody for Christmas and was thrilled to sink into it. Anna Kendrick is certainly on my list of favorite actors at the moment, as is Aubrey Plaza and they make adorable best friends, so I couldn’t wait to begin reading it. I’ve only ever read a few other Hollywood actors biographies before like Down the Rabbit Hole and The Princess Diarist, so I was expecting much of the same: entertaining stories that happened behind the scenes, realness when it comes to being an actor, and more reasons to love the author. All of which I got when reading Scrappy Little Nobody.

Reading someone’s biography is like sneaking into their diary–and sometimes this is the point. The reader is able to learn something personal, something intimate about the person that sets them apart from stardom and places them on level ground with ordinary people. If I read a biography about a writer, learning about their past life, relationships, and home life provides insight into their written works, giving speculations as to why some stories are told a certain way, why some subjects are more important than others. However, when reading a biography about someone from Hollywood, there is a little less to gain intellectually and more to learn about the actor’s past in general, not really how it imposes on their career.

I wanted to love this biography because I love Anna Kendrick but it read sporadically and not in a way that Jenny Lawson’s memoirs are (that is almost a part of her theme). I don’t think it should have been set in chronological order, but it seemed to be random story-telling versus something Kendrick wanted to get off her chest and tell the world. This style made it easy to read, however. Since they were pretty random, one could read one chapter or one story at a time without needing to read the entire book in one sitting. It is short and easy, so it’s possible to read the whole book in one sitting, it’s just not necessary. And of course her stories are entertaining and made me love her even more, which isn’t hard since she’s so great.

Both Pitch Perfect movies are hilarious, female-lead movies, as well as Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates which is equally funny and strangely feminine (also who isn’t in love with Zac Efron too?). And learning about Kendrick’s struggle as an actress in the beginning–because who doesn’t struggle in the beginning–makes her even more adorable. She is exactly the type of person she claims to be; silly, quirky, stoner, lovable, hardworking, and more. She is totally relatable, at least to me:

As an adult, being square is more or less an acceptable personality trait. The only time I desperately wanted to be rebellious was in adolescence. I wanted to be Rizzo, not Sandra Dee! I had to will myself to break rules when I could stomach it. While I’ll admit I enjoyed the thrill, I was not “the bad kid.” In fact…I was a painfully typical example of “the good kid.” During free period, even on the rare Maine sunny day, I’d stay in the cafeteria and do my Latin homework. Not because I was smart, but because I assumed the fabric of the universe would disintegrate if I didn’t. But the qualities that made me a square as a teenager–dedication, independence, maturity–led me to break the biggest rule of all (55).

completely agree. I was never rebellious–that was my brother’s job as we were growing up, and Anna’s brother seemed to be the same way (you can see why we’re so similar and therefore should be best friends). I also was terrified to not do my homework and when something would interrupt my set aside homework time, I would literally freak out (because of mental illness) but still.

Kendrick also talks about the struggle she had to go through to become the hilarious star she is today. There were so many movies I either forgot or didn’t even know she was in–like Twilight. I completely forgot she was even in that movie–she was such a baby! Also, Camp? Does anyone even know this movie? I felt so special that I knew what she was talking about during that entire chapter. Good times.

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